Education


History is the Story Told...

By the victors - so runs the usual saying. But I don't think it's true. There is a story that Stalin was once discussing propaganda with some of his henchmen, who told him that they would squash a rumor he didn't like. Stalin only shook his head sadly and said: "But people will still talk."

It seems to me that history is the story told by the survivors. In other words, the record that we can find. It may be a list of battles carved in stone. It may be the diary of a little girl who did not, personally survive. It may be an artefact dug up by an archeologist, or the thickness of a ring in a tree, or even a tune. The victors may have got lucky; but the survivors, I think, have the last word.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did You Know?
Potatoes were made illegal in France for 24 years ! The French became convinced that the South American vegetable could cause a whole host of diseases, including leprosy, so in 1748, the cultivation and consumption of potatoes was strictly outlawed. It wasn’t until an imprisoned medical army officer named Antoine Auguste Parmentier survived in his prison cell subsisting solely on a diet of potatoes that acceptance of the food began to shift. After being released from prison, Parmentier went on to write a thesis about its health benefits, helping to overturn the law and re-introduce the potato to the French public in 1772. Within 20 years, potatoes became one of the most popular, and indeed, important foods in France. Even the ornamental royal gardens in Tuileres Palace in Paris - originally filled with flowers and exotic plants - were converted into potato fields.




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